Fischer Rollerski Summer 2015 Preview

Fischer Rollerski Summer 2015 Preview

Over the past decade Austrian brand Fischer has cemented itself as a premier provider of race skis that perform consistently fast. This is echoed in the fact that a significant portion of international competitors choose Fischer skis. The company also now seems ready to corner the boot market with their new SpeedMax Skate Boots, you can read my first impressions of those boots here.

For the 2015 / 2016 season Fischer has entered an entirely new market for the company, rollerskis. For this year they have released a classic and a skate ski in two product tiers: Carbonlite and RC7, and a skate and combi ski for juniors. All of which come NIS mounted except the carbonlite models.

In this post I will attempt to breakdown the differences and similarities between all of the different models.

Carbonlite

The Carbonlite skate and classic skis from Fischer employ a carbon fiber shaft with an air core composite to aid in their on snow feel. The composite shafts on these skis will provide superior road noise dampening and help with ankle/leg fatigue on rough roads. Although the composite shafts lend themselves to a smooth ride this does not mean you are compromising on responsiveness or weight. Carbon fiber combined with Fischer’s air core technology results in a combination, not unlike their snow skis, but stiff enough to handle the stresses of rollerskiing.

Carbonlite Skate

Carbonlite Skate

Carbonlite Classic

Carbonlite Classic

 RC7

The RC7 classic and skate rollerskis from Fischer are a more affordable summer training option than the Carbonlite skate and classic. The main difference between the two models are their shaft material. While the carbonlite model has a carbon composite shaft with an air core center, the RC7s’ employ an aluminum shaft. This results in a lighter and stiffer ski. The RC7 is over 100 grams lighter than the carbonlite model, but you may be asking why would you spend the money on the carbonlites’? Well it all comes down to vibration dampening and on snow feel. The carbonlites’ are going to absorb far more road noise than the RC7s’ and are going to feel much more like traditional skis on traditional snow. So if neither of those things matter to you, or you are looking to save some money, than the RC7s’ are great deal! These come NIS mounted out of the box.

RC7 Skate

RC7 Skate

RC7 Classic

RC7 Classic

 Junior

Fischer is also offering two junior rollerski models, a skate ski as well as a combi ski. Both are essentially shorter versions of the RC7 models employing aluminum shafts. Both of these skis come NIS mounted out of the box.

Junior Combi

Junior Combi

Junior Skate

Junior Skate

Have you tried out any of Fischer’s new rollerskis? Let me know in the comments down below! And I also should be posting some impressions and a review on some of these skis in the near future!

  • iAasen

    So, to be honest i was a bit dissapointed that Fischer only chose to update their previous rollerski-only boot with new cosmetics (based on the old carbonlite boot – why black is preferential to yellow for rolleskiing i have NO clue as i’ve been in enough near-miss accidents to know that bright colours are ALWAYS a good idea). That said i’ve already got the SSR/Speedmax boot and after having tried winter vs summer boots on several brands i actually dont see the point in buying summer boots unless you live in the desert because when it rains (as it does in Norway) the winter boots keep the feet dry (or drier) and warm on cold spring/fall outings. Yes, they may get warm on hot summer days but it really isnt that big a deal and even though i love gear (and buying it) there is a threshold, even for me.
    As for the rollerskis: Weeeeell, they’re ok. Skate rollerskis are really only different in either length or material and rubber compund, where as classic models vary greatly e.g. wheel size, placement of ratchet, stability issues, ease of use in.. diagonal? (the technique used for climbing steep hills etc). Anyway, as far as im concerned the differences in skate skis is so minimal that any brand (nearly) will do, the rest is cosmetic. Granted there is a debate on wether long vs short length improves or hampers correct technique when you’re back on snow but apart from that the only real difference is dampening, and to be frank this has never been an issue for me in all the years i’ve been rollerskiing (I use Swenor Skate Long or ProSki S5e ((now Swix)), both have aluminium frames). The same goes for classic (ProSki C2/C1 and a local brand IDT Dynagrip ((needs a review here, has a patended system so that you can adjust the amount of grip you get from kicking)), again both aluminium frames.

    • I totally agree regarding the color way of Fischer’s rollerski boots for this summer. Not only is yellow a good high visibility color, it is kind of better looking on the breathable material they are made out of. I assume they updated them to match the color scheme of all of their new gear for this season. In my opinion this is most definitely not worth the safety trade off, not to mention black gears tendency to attract heat, somewhat defeating the point of summer rollerski boots in the first place… As for the skis go, I should actually be getting my hand on these next week and will be doing a full length review!